Essay On Homework Is A Good Practice

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homework essay

introduction

I wrote this essay assignment on 9th Apr in 2014. This essay was to right an argument and persuasive essay, using toulmin model that we learned in class. We had to find evidence online, and do the bibliography.

reflection

Finding the data and work citing was the hardest part. We had to find accurate data which can make the claim strong and persuasive. We also had to write all the materials we used and referred. I think I did well on the body paragraphs. If I can write again, I'd like to try devil's advocate, to support the opposite opinion. I learned how to claim, use evidence, find warrant, and how to conclude.




Homework benefits students

     Compared to the past, the amount of homework that schools assign for students became more and more. Some people argue that school should ban homework, but do homework really not have benefits? I think homework is necessary, and shouldn’t be banned. Homework is not only good for reviewing studies in the classes, but also can assess how well students understand and how well the teachers teach. Also, some people argue that the time students spend doing homework is a waste, but it’s not true. In fact, managing time for homework is a good preparation for the future.

     Firstly, reviewing the works in the classes can help students not forget what they learnt, and get high scores. When students learn new things in the school, they are lasted as short-term memory. By practice of information, which is homework we talk here, short-term memory is converted into long-term memory, so that students won’t forget after days. (Adult_brain_growth.ppt) Only if the students made the things they learnt into unforgettable information, would they not have to review all the things before tests, and get higher score in the tests. It’s actually much easier for students on the whole compared to doing great amount of revision just before the tests. According to the results of several studies, “the average homework completer had higher unit test scores than 73 percent of non-completers (Cooper, Robinson, & Patall, 2006)” (David J. Marks, PhD). This made evident that completing homework can truly higher students’ test scores.

     Second, homework can help both students and teachers to assess their learning and teaching conditions in order to improve them. Students would be able to find the points they are confused about, or they are poor at. On the same breath, teachers can check if students really understand the lessons, and if the teaching methods are good fits for students.

     Lastly, doing homework could be a good preparation for future careers because people often have assignments even they grew up and are working. The article about spending time on homework is worth it says, “Having more meaningful homework assignments can help build management skills” (Jane Eyre), and “For high school students, doing assignments outside of the classroom get them interested in a career path.” (Jane Eyre) This shows that doing homework is not only good for the academic studies students are studying now, but also good for future careers and life styles.

     To conclude, homework can help students with their studies, assessing, and careers in the future. So if schools ban homework, students would easily forget what they’ve learnt in class and have no idea about how well they are doing in the studies. Have students had whole afterschool time as free time, they wouldn’t be able to finish reading books or projects as well. Therefore, homework benefits students, and shouldn’t be banned by schools.

 

 

Work Cited

Adult_brain_growth.ppt

 

David J. Marks, PhD and CSC Staff. “Homework: How it helps, and how parents can help kids get

              it right.” 1 April 2014. Aug 2011.

              http://www.aboutourkids.org/articles/homework_how_it_helps_how_parents_can_help_kids_get_it_right

 

Diane Ravitch, “Why Homework is Good for Kids.” HUFFPOST HEALTHY LIVING. 22 March 2007.

             1 April 2014.

             http://www.huffingtonpost.com/diane-ravitch/why-homework-is-good-for-_b_44037.html


As kids return to school, debate is heating up once again over how they should spend their time after they leave the classroom for the day.

The no-homework policy of a second-grade teacher in Texas went viral last week, earning praise from parents across the country who lament the heavy workload often assigned to young students. Brandy Young told parents she would not formally assign any homework this year, asking students instead to eat dinner with their families, play outside and go to bed early.

But the question of how much work children should be doing outside of school remains controversial, and plenty of parents take issue with no-homework policies, worried their kids are losing a potential academic advantage. Here’s what you need to know:

The issue

For decades, the homework standard has been a “10-minute rule,” which recommends a daily maximum of 10 minutes of homework per grade level. Second graders, for example, should do about 20 minutes of homework each night. High school seniors should complete about two hours of homework each night. The National PTA and the National Education Association both support that guideline.

But some schools have begun to give their youngest students a break. A Massachusetts elementary school has announced a no-homework pilot program for the coming school year, lengthening the school day by two hours to provide more in-class instruction. “We really want kids to go home at 4 o’clock, tired. We want their brain to be tired,” Kelly Elementary School Principal Jackie Glasheen said in an interview with a local TV station. “We want them to enjoy their families. We want them to go to soccer practice or football practice, and we want them to go to bed. And that’s it.”

A New York City public elementary school implemented a similar policy last year, eliminating traditional homework assignments in favor of family time. The change was quickly met with outrage from some parents, though it earned support from other education leaders.

New solutions and approaches to homework differ by community, and these local debates are complicated by the fact that even education experts disagree about what’s best for kids.

The research

The most comprehensive research on homework to date comes from a 2006 meta-analysis by Duke University psychology professor Harris Cooper, who found evidence of a positive correlation between homework and student achievement, meaning students who did homework performed better in school. The correlation was stronger for older students—in seventh through 12th grade—than for those in younger grades, for whom there was a weak relationship between homework and performance.

Cooper’s analysis focused on how homework impacts academic achievement—test scores, for example. His report noted that homework is also thought to improve study habits, attitudes toward school, self-discipline, inquisitiveness and independent problem solving skills. On the other hand, some studies he examined showed that homework can cause physical and emotional fatigue, fuel negative attitudes about learning and limit leisure time for children. At the end of his analysis, Cooper recommended further study of such potential effects of homework.

Despite the weak correlation between homework and performance for young children, Cooper argues that a small amount of homework is useful for all students. Second-graders should not be doing two hours of homework each night, he said, but they also shouldn’t be doing no homework.

The debate

Not all education experts agree entirely with Cooper’s assessment.

Cathy Vatterott, an education professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, supports the “10-minute rule” as a maximum, but she thinks there is not sufficient proof that homework is helpful for students in elementary school.

“Correlation is not causation,” she said. “Does homework cause achievement, or do high achievers do more homework?”

Vatterott, the author of Rethinking Homework: Best Practices That Support Diverse Needs, thinks there should be more emphasis on improving the quality of homework tasks, and she supports efforts to eliminate homework for younger kids.

“I have no concerns about students not starting homework until fourth grade or fifth grade,” she said, noting that while the debate over homework will undoubtedly continue, she has noticed a trend toward limiting, if not eliminating, homework in elementary school.

The issue has been debated for decades. A TIME cover in 1999 read: “Too much homework! How it’s hurting our kids, and what parents should do about it.” The accompanying story noted that the launch of Sputnik in 1957 led to a push for better math and science education in the U.S. The ensuing pressure to be competitive on a global scale, plus the increasingly demanding college admissions process, fueled the practice of assigning homework.

“The complaints are cyclical, and we’re in the part of the cycle now where the concern is for too much,” Cooper said. “You can go back to the 1970s, when you’ll find there were concerns that there was too little, when we were concerned about our global competitiveness.”

Cooper acknowledged that some students really are bringing home too much homework, and their parents are right to be concerned.

“A good way to think about homework is the way you think about medications or dietary supplements,” he said. “If you take too little, they’ll have no effect. If you take too much, they can kill you. If you take the right amount, you’ll get better.”

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