The Lowell Offering Essay

The Lowell Offering

Beginning in the 1820s, a group of Boston businessmen built textile mills in Lowell, Massachusetts. The first factories recruited women from rural New England as their labor force. These young women, far from home, lived in rows of boardinghouses adjacent to the growing number of mills. The Lowell Offering was a monthly magazine written by these women workers and published from 1840 to 1845. Its contents included songs, poems, essays, and stories--both serious and humorous--about what it was like to work in the mills. It was first organized and edited by a local minister and supported by the city's textile companies. As this cover illustration suggests, it promoted morality and hard work among the young female workers.

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Source | The Lowell Offering, December 1845.
Creator | Unknown
Item Type | Poster/Print
Cite This document | Unknown, “The Lowell Offering,” HERB: Resources for Teachers, accessed March 13, 2018, https://herb.ashp.cuny.edu/items/show/1986.

Note: The following sources have been used for identifying the actual names behind some writers’ pseudonyms:

Harriet Hanson Robinson, Names and Noms de Plume of the Writers in The Lowell Offering, 1902 (Reprinted in Judith Ranta, Women and Children of the Mills: An Annotated Guide to Nineteenth-Century American Textile Factory Literature [Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1999], p. 299-300)

Harriet Hanson Robinson, Loom and Spindle; or, Life among the Early Mill Girls (1898; Kailua, Hawaii: Press Pacifica, 1976).  See Holdings.

Harriet Jane Farley, Shells from the Strand of the Sea of Genius (Boston: Munroe, 1847)

Harriot F. Curtis, S.S.S. Philosophy (Lowell: Merrill & Heywood, 1847)

Research by Martha Mayo, Director of the Center for Lowell History

Research by Judith A. Ranta

Changes in title information, cover epigraphs, etc., are noted for the issues in which they first appear.  The colors of the covers of individual issues include blue, yellow, orange, beige, and green.

Abbreviations:
“m.” = married
“n.m.” = never married
 

Series 1, No. 1-4 (October 1840 - March 1841), 64 pp.

Series 1, No. 1 (October 1840), p. 1-16

Cover i: The Lowell Offering: A Repository of Original Articles on Various Subjects, Written by Factory Operatives.  “This number wholly written by females employed in the mills.”  Epigraph: “Full many a gem of purest ray serene, / The dark, unfathomed caves of ocean bear; / Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, / And waste its sweetness on the desert air.”  “Price 6¼ cts.”  Includes table of contents.  “Lowell, Mass., Printed by A. Watson, 15 Central Street.”

Cover ii: Advertisements.

P. 1-2: “History of a Hemlock Broom. Written by Itself” by Hannah.  Essay: humorous.

P. 2: “The Mother’s Love” by M. [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser) or Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Brief essay on “the strength of the mother’s love” with religious message.

P. 2-3: “Beauty of Leaves” by H.J. [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  This letter written by a sister to her brother expresses appreciation of nature and books.

P. 3-4: “Woman’s Proper Sphere” by B--- [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Essay arguing that men and women are fitted to very different spheres.  Woman’s sphere is the home.  “Why leave the pleasant duties that await her at her own fireside, for others which require the daring and bold spirit, and more enduring frame of man to execute?”

P. 4: “The Blessings of Memory” by Dorothea.  Brief prose opinion piece about “the ever-constant joys of memory.”

P. 4-5: “A Letter about Old Maids” by Betsey [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Humorous prose sketch showing the importance of old maids.  The narrator concludes, “Having thus introduced myself, and shown the utility of the tribe [i.e., old maids] to which I belong, I reveal it as my design to furnish certain recollections of my youthful days . . . of simple country girls.”  See Holdings.

P. 5-7: “Recollections of an Old Maid.  Number I” by Betsey [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Humorous prose sketch set in New Hampshire, considering the term “lady” as applied to a sheltered girl, Ruth A.

P. 7: “Autumn’s Doings” by Cynthia.  Ballad lamenting summer’s passing with religious message.

P. 7-8: “The Pleasures of Science” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay extolling science and scientists.

P. 8-9: “The Garden of Science” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay extolling science and scientists.

P. 9: “The Tomb of Washington” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad honoring George Washington as “the noblest, best.”

P. 9: “Shall We Know Each Other in Heaven?” by Emeline.  Essay conveying spiritualist and religious messages.

P. 10-11: “Mr. Birch and Mr. Spruce” by B.H.J.  Dialogue between two trees.

P. 11: “Longings of the Spirit” by Enileda [Adeline Bradley (m. John D. Sturtevant)].  Essay with religious message.

P. 11-12: “Beauty and Wealth.”  Didactic essay arguing that beauty and wealth do not bring true happiness.

P. 12: “Divine Love” by Ellen.  Ballad in hymn stanzas with religious message.

P. 12-13: “Autumn Reflections” by M.Y.  Essay conveying nature appreciation and religious message.

P. 13-14: “Mount Auburn” by Zillah.  Essay: narrator tours Mount Auburn Cemetery and reflects on death, with religious overtones. See Holdings.

P. 14-15: “Thoughts on a Rainy Day” by T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay with religious message.

P. 15: “Old Bachelor’s Friend” by Twenty-Four.  Humorous prose piece defending “the name and character of Old Bachelors.”

P. 16: “Editorial Corner: Objects of The Offering” [by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas discusses the periodical’s aims, as well as prejudice against mill workers.  As he writes, “The objects of the publication are, to encourage the cultivation of talent; to preserve such articles as are deemed most worthy of preservation; and to correct an erroneous idea which generally prevails in relation to the intelligence of persons employed in the Mills.”  Contributors will be paid in copies.

Cover iii: Advertisements.
 

Series 1, No. 2 (December 1840), p. 17-32

Cover ii: Advertisements.

Cover ii: “To Correspondents” [by Abel C. Thomas and Thomas B. Thayer].  In this editorial, Thomas and Thayer explain that they will publish only women’s writings.  Several extracts of reviews are reproduced.  List of periodicals published in Lowell.  Advertisements.  See Holdings.

P. 17-19: “Factory Girls” by A Factory Girl [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay responding to Orestes Brownson, defending the virtue and intelligence of many mill women.

P. 19: “A social meeting, denominated Improvement Circle . . .” by Editors [Abel C. Thomas and Thomas B. Thayer].  Editorial describing the Improvement Circle’s procedures.

P. 19-20: “The Spirit Flower Transplanted” by Mary [Mary Anne Leonard (m. William G.T. Pierce)].  Essay conveying nature appreciation and religious message.

P. 20: “A Sister’s Tomb” by Agnes [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)].  Ballad composed in hymn stanzas.  The speaker reflects on her sister’s death at sea.  With religious faith, she contends that  “we . . . shall meet her again.”  See Holdings.

P. 20-21: “The Hill-Side and the Fountain Rill” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Essay: narrator seeks in nature “relief” from “the dull monotony of factory life.”

P. 21-22: “Recollections of an Old Maid.  Number II” by Betsey [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Village sketch; regionalist; New Hampshire setting.  The narrator reminiscences about girls from her hometown, considering the meaning of women’s beauty.

P. 22-24: “Flowers” by Emeline.  Essay conveying nature appreciation.  The narrator asserts that flowers are “the most beautiful and instructive object in nature.”

P. 24-25: “Contentment” by Dorothea.  Essay: narrator argues that virtue, not wealth, brings peace of mind.

P. 25: “Lowell, a Parody on Hohenlinden” by L.S.H. [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad praising the Lowell Offering.

P. 25-26: “Pleasures of Factory Life” by S.G.B. [Sarah George Bagley (m. James Durno)].  Essay: Text somewhat changed by the editors, as an appended note indicates. See Holdings.

P. 26-27: “The Nature of Man” by Mariette.  Essay arguing that “Man is a complex being . . . animal, moral and intellectual.” 

P. 27: “To a Kindred Heart” by E.A.  Ballad in hymn stanzas conveying a religious message.

P. 27-28: “Celestial Scenery” by Lisette [Louisa Currier (m. Nehemiah Osgood)].  Science fiction: protagonist travels to the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and the moon. 

P. 28: “Utility of Observation” by A. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay asserting that people can learn by observing “men, things” and nature.

P. 28-29: “The Bride’s Maid’s Appeal” by Cora.  This letter from a bride’s maid to the husband-to-be urges him to “renounce everything that can intoxicate.”  Temperance theme.

P. 29-30: “A Merrimack Reverie” by Abigail [Abby D. Turner (m. John Caryl)].  Mill girl’s dream allegory expressing appreciation for nature.

P. 30: “Old Maids and Old Bachelors. Their Relative Value in Society” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Humorous essay comparing the value of old maids and old bachelors.

P. 31: “The Instructions of Affliction” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Didactic essay contending that affliction’s frequent visits bring with them “serious teachings and admonitions.”

P. 32: “Editorial Corner. Plants and Flowers in the Mills” [by Abel C. Thomas and Thomas B. Thayer].  Editorial including discussion of the importance of cultivating plants and flowers in the mills, as well as some other editorial commentary on the Lowell Offering.

Cover iii-iv: Advertisements.
 

Series 1, No. 3 (February 1841), p. 33-48

Cover i: The Lowell Offering: A Repository of Original Articles, Written by Females Employed in the Mills.

Cover ii: “Proposals for publishing a volume, in the style of the popular annuals. To Be Entitled, The Garland of the Mills. Written by Factory Operatives” by Editors of The Offering [Abel C. Thomas and Thomas B. Thayer].  Proposal to publish an anthology of mill women’s writings.  “To Readers and Correspondents.”  Advertisement.

P. 33-36: “The Sea of Genius” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay: narrator wishes that she might possess the gift of literary genius, mentioning many authors.

P. 36: “Nature Colored by Our Feelings” by Mary [Mary Anne Leonard (m. William G.T. Pierce)].  Essay.

P. 36-37: “Time” by Elizabeth.  Essay examining “the uncertainty of life.”

P. 37-38: “A Morning Last Summer” by L.R.  Partly fictionalized essay conveying appreciation for nature.

P. 38: “No” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad considering the importance of the word “no.”

P. 38-39: “A Marvelous Incident” by M. [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser) or Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Personal essay contending that seemingly supernatural events can often be explained scientifically.

P. 39-40: “Reflections at Home. Written during a Visit to my Kindred and Friends” by Dorothea.  Personal essay: narrator discusses the lessons she has learned from ten years of living and working among strangers.

P. 40: “Birds and Trees” by Sarah [Sarah George Bagley (m. James Durno)]. Personal essay expressing appreciation for nature.  The narrator recalls “the loved haunts of my childhood.”

P. 40-42: “Christmas” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Village sketch.  The narrator recalls a past Christmas, when she lived “in a small manufacturing village.”  Humor and religious theme.

P. 42: “The Rose Bush” by L.M.B.  Personal essay: narrator avers, “Unlike the rose, the soul shall bloom to fade no more forever.”

P. 42: “The Love of Nature a Duty” by Agnes [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)].  Brief essay conveying appreciation for nature.

P. 43: “My Grandmother’s Fireside” by S.W.S.  The narrator relates her grandmother’s story of the Revolution, the “Spectre Warrior.”

P. 44: “Our Daily Paths” by S.  Essay conveying nature appreciation and religious themes.

P. 44: “Lessons of the Heavens” by A. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay contending that we can see God reflected in the sky.

P. 44-46: “Gold Watches” by A Factory Girl.  Essay responding to Mrs. Sarah Josepha Hale's (1788-1879) story in the Godey's Lady's Book complaining that factory girls cannot be distinguished from ladies; addresses class bias. See Holdings.

P. 46: “Time’s Changes” by S.B.  Essay narrator laments the loss of her childhood home and friends.

P. 46-48: “The Party at Home” by Emma.  Fiction extolling the joys of home.

P. 48: “Plan for Mutual Relief” by Editors [Abel C. Thomas and Thomas B. Thayer]. The editors ask superintendents and operatives to contribute to a fund for ill operatives. See Holdings.

P. 48: “No Theatre in Lowell” [by Abel C. Thomas?]. Thomas criticizes “[t]he demoralizing tendency of theatres.”

Cover iii-iv: Advertisements.
 

Series 1, No. 4 (March 1841), p. 49-64

Cover ii: “Permanency of the Offering” [by Abel C. Thomas and Thomas B. Thayer].  Since the Lowell Offering has won a “high opinion” in the community, the editors discuss their plans to make it permanent and begin a new series in April.  Two other notes.

P. 49-52: “Recollections of an Old Maid.  Number III” by Betsey [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Village sketch; humor; New Hampshire setting.  The narrator remembers girls from her hometown.

P. 52-53: “A Woman’s Voice to Woman” by Viola.  Essay advocating greater charity and tolerance among women.

P. 53-54: “The Friend of All” by Sarah [Sarah George Bagley (m. James Durno)].  Essay discussing the importance of hope to humanity.

P. 54: “Lessons of the Forest” by A. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay conveying appreciation for nature.

P. 54: “Indolence and Industry. An Allegory” by K.  Allegory upholding the importance of industry.

P. 55: “I Ask No Boon but Virtue” by Dorothea.  Ballad stressing the importance of virtue.

P. 55-57: “The Last Witch of Salmagundi” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Village sketch; regionalist; humor; New Hampshire setting.  The narrator remembers a woman from her hometown who was accused of witchcraft.

P. 57: “Death of My Mother” by Eveleen.  Autobiographical essay narrator remarks, “O my mother! may I strive to live a life as pure and blameless as thine.”

P. 58: “The Snow Birds” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Personal essay conveying nature appreciation and sadness for the passage of time.

P. 58-59: “Doing Good” by S.  Essay stressing the importance of doing good.

P. 59: “My Burial Place” by Lucy.  Ballad expressing the speaker’s hope to be buried with her family.  Religious message.

P. 59-61: “The Cousins” by H.  This short story, with its factory-girl heroine, aims to reduce prejudice against factory operatives.

P. 61: “A Familiar Letter” by Dorothea.  In this correspondence addressed to Lowell Offering contributors, a factory woman visiting her New Hampshire home expresses appreciation for the Offering, as it has reduced prejudice against mill women.

P. 62: “Winter” by Estelle [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Didactic fiction.

P. 62-63: “A Visit in the Country” by Eliza.  Autobiographical essay reflecting on a death in the family.

P. 62-63: “A Pic-Nic Party” by C. [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Allegorical prose piece expressing appreciation for the Improvement Circle.

P. 64: “The Garland of the Mills” [by Abel C. Thomas].  In this editorial commentary, Thomas discusses his plan to publish an anthology of factory women’s writings.

P. 64: “Improvements in the Offering” by Editors [Abel C. Thomas and Thomas B. Thayer].  Thomas and Thayer discuss their plans to make the periodical permanent and offer it by subscription.  “The experiment has satisfied us that the Offering may be permanently established; and we therefore propose to commence an improved series in April, adopting the usual plan of a list of subscribers.”

Cover iii: Advertisements.
 

Series 1, No. 1-12 (April-December 1841), 380 pp.

Series 1, No. 1 (April 1841), p. 1-32

Cover i: Published by Powers & Bagley, 15 Central Street, Lowell.

Cover ii: “Recommendation of the Offering.”  The periodical is endorsed by important men in the community and mills (list of names included).  The Offering’s agents in Boston, Massachusetts, and Nashua and Portsmouth, New Hampshire, are listed.

P. iii-iv: “Editor’s Preface” [by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas explains that all the articles are “in good faith and exclusively, the productions of Females employed in the Mills.”  He gives some history of the Improvement Circle from which the Lowell Offering originated.  He asserts that manual labor hinders “the full developement of mental power” and explains that the editors have taken very little liberty with amending the articles.

P. 1-8: “Abby’s Year in Lowell” by Lucinda [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Didactic fiction featuring a factory-girl heroine, who learns to save her wages.

P. 8-9: “Return of Spring” by Dorothea.  Essay conveying nature appreciation and religious themes.

P. 9-10: “The Snow-Storm” by S.W.S.  Fiction.

P. 11-12: “Appearances” by Elizabeth.  Fiction with a temperance theme.

P. 12: “An Acrostic” by Dora.  Ballad with lines forming the letters “Lowell Offering.”  In the Lowell Offering are “fruits of heart and mind, / Gathered from the spirit’s store.”

P. 13-14: “A Visit from Hope” by H.  Allegorical fiction: Hope visits the narrator, an orphan.  She journey to her native village.  Her father died in a foreign land.

P. 15-16: “My Country’s Flag” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad challenging aristocracy, slavery, and the “chain” that holds back the speaker from “knowledge [that] grows on every tree.”

P. 16-19: “The First Wedding in Salmagundi” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Village sketch relating memories of the narrator’s New Hampshire hometown.

P. 19: “A Celebration” by B.M.W.  Patriotic personal essay about an Independence Day celebration.

P. 21: “Bless, and Curse Not” by Lisetta [Louisa Currier (m. Nehemiah Osgood)].  Essay on the Athenians, maintaining the importance of mercy.

P. 21-24: “Ancient Poetry” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay conveying the narrator’s appreciation of ancient poetry, including that of the Bible.

P. 24-28: “The Sleigh-Ride” by Constance [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Personal essay relating memories of the narrator’s home and family.

P. 28-29: “The Dying Parent” by Mary S.  Short fiction conveying a religious message.

P. 29-31: “Forgiveness” by Eveleen.  Essay on the importance of forgiveness, with a religious theme.

P. 31: “The Rivulet” by Cynthia.  In this ballad, the speaker sees her “Maker’s hand” in nature.

[P. 32]: “Song of the Spinners.”  This song with lyrics and music includes the following lines: “[L]abor to leisure a zest imparts, Unknown to the idle throng.”  “Dependent on others we ne’er will be, So long as we’re able to spin.”  In “Editor’s Valedictory” (v. 2 [1842], p. 379-80), Abel C. Thomas indicates that this and the other song are not the “productions of female actively employed in the Mills.” See Holdings.

Cover iii: The text describes some of the Lowell Offering’s characteristics.  The editor writes, “ . . . The Offering is the only magazine now published, or in progress, (so far as we can learn,) written exclusively by Females employed in the Mills.  We desire to promote the interests of all factory operatives–but of Females, especially . . .”  A poem, “A Song of Home.”

Cover iv: Engraving of St. Anne’s Episcopal Church, Lowell.
 

Series 1, No. 2 (May 1841), p. 33-64

P. 33-39: “The Wedding Dress” by Hannah.  Short fiction: by making her own wedding dress, a factory woman attracts a rich husband.

P 41-42: “Happiness” by Caroline [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)].  Prose; semi-allegorical, didactic dream vision.

P. 44-45: “A Vision of Truth” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Prose dream allegory with a factory woman heroine, expressing appreciation for the Improvement Circle and the Lowell Offering.

P. 45-47: “The Western Antiquities” by Lisette [Louisa Currier (m. Nehemiah Osgood)].  Essay discussing early Western relics found in America.

P. 48-51: “Early Morning” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay describing the pleasures of early rising.

P. 51-53: “Familiar Sketches, No. 1.  The Sisters” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Short fiction promoting a favorable view of factory women.  After her father’s death, fifteen-year-old Maria goes to work in the mills to support her mother.

P. 54-56: “David and the Bear” by Constance [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Regionalist historical fiction.

P. 58-60: “The Heroine of Columbia” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)]. The subject of this prose piece with some ballad verse is Spanish history; heroic heroine.

P. 61-62: “Translations from the French” by L. [Lura Currier (m. Augustus Whitney)] and M. [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser) or Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].

P. 62-63: “Evening Meditation” by Nancy W.  Essay conveying a religious message.

[P. 64]: “Song of the Weavers.”  This song with lyrics and music expresses the cheerfulness of weavers singing while they work. See Holdings.

Cover iii-iv: “Lowell Offering” [by Abel C. Thomas?].  This editorial commentary specifies some of the periodical’s aims and includes a poem, “A Song of Home.”
 

Series 1, No. 3 (June 1841), p. 65-96

P. 65-68: “Tales of Factory Life, No. 1” by S.G.B. [Sarah George Bagley (m. James Durno)].  Short fiction featuring a factory-girl heroine and a favorable view of mill work.  A mistreated bound girl runs away to Lowell, where she soon prospers from working in the mills. See Holdings.

P. 68-70: “Childhood’s Home” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Autobiographical essay set in New Hampshire.

P. 70-72: “Our Physician” by Jemima [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Village sketch: regionalist humorous fiction set in New Hampshire.

P. 73: “Past Hours” by Adelia [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad exploring life’s happiness and sadness.

P. 73-74: “Night” by Clementine.  Essay describing the beauty of the night sky.

P. 74-78: “Ann and Myself.  No Fiction” by Matilda.  Personal essay examining the prejudice against factory girls and the experience of school teaching.

P. 78-84: “Recollections of my Childhood” by Betsey [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Autobiographical; village sketch; regionalist; humor; New Hampshire setting.  The narrator recalls some of her childhood pastimes and district school experiences.

P. 84-85: “The Funeral of Harrison” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad.

P. 86-87: “The Old Fashioned Coat” by Jennet.  Regionalist sketch.

P. 88: “Welcome May” by Alice [Alice Ann Carter (m. John Currier)].  Ballad praising nature and Nature’s God.

P. 88-96: “Clara Stanly” by Enileda [Adeline Bradley (m. John D. Sturtevant)].  Short fiction set in New Hampshire, considering “the effects of envy.”

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas discusses the article written by Orestes Brownson and the Lowell Offering response written by Harriet Jane Farley, considering prejudice against mill women. See Holdings.

Cover iv: Engraving of First Congregational Church, Lowell.
 

Series 1, No. 4 (July 1841), p. 97-128

P. 97-105: “Clara Stanly” (cont’d) by Enileda [Adeline Bradley (m. John D. Sturtevant)].  Short fiction set in New Hampshire, considering “the effects of envy.”

P. 105-06: “Old Ironsides” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad about the famous battleship.

P. 106-07: “A Spring Phantasy” by A.D.T. [Abby D. Turner (m. John Caryl)].  Prose dream vision conveying nature appreciation and religious sentiments.

P. 108-09: “Saturday Night” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay.

P. 109-11: “Playthings” by Experience.  Essay.

P. 111-14: “Spirit of Discontent” by Almira.  Short fiction about factory women. See Holdings.

P. 114-16: “The Black Glove” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Village sketch; historical fiction; regionalist fiction; set in New Hampshire.

P. 116-17: “Passing Away” by M. [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser) or Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Brief essay considering the changefulness of life.

P. 117-18: “Fancy” by Fiducia.  Ballad: “Fancy leaves the mill behind.”

P. 119-20: “The Old Clock” by S.W.S.  Brief essay: narrator reminisces about her Massachusetts family’s old clock and considers Revolutionary patriotism.

P. 121-24: “The Lock of Gray Hair” by Theresa.  Personal essay relating memories of the narrator’s New Hampshire family, and including feminist themes and expressions of Revolutionary patriotism.

P.125-28: “Familiar Sketches, No. 2.  The Fig Tree” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Fiction considering the subject of disappointed love.  At the story’s conclusion, the heroine enters the Lowell mills.

Cover iv: engraving of Methodist Church, Hurd Street, Lowell.
 

Series 1, No. 5 (15 July 1841), p. 129-60

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Text includes the prospectus of the Lowell Offering.  Thomas contends that “The Offering is recommended by the Mayor of Lowell, the Superintendents of the Corporations, and by other gentlemen of high standing.”  The periodical’s agents are listed.  Thomas also mentions that Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)] has left the mills to become a public school teacher in Lowell.

P. 129-35: “Woman” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay contending that in America woman is “the oppressed.”  The narrator argues that women should retain their special feminine qualities.  In some areas they cannot compete with men.

P. 135: Engraving of St. Ann’s Episcopal Church, Lowell.

P. 136: “The Forlorn One” by Frances.  Ballad expressing regret for having injured a woman whose “fame” is now “blighted.”

P. 136-45: “Prejudice against Labor” by Ethelinda.  Factory girl story aiming to reduce prejudice against mill women.

P. 145: Engraving of the First Baptist Church, Lowell.

P. 146-47: “The Rose” by Mary [Mary Anne Leonard (m. William G.T. Pierce)].  Essay about the rose.

[P. 148-49]: “A Song of Victory.”  Religious hymn with lyrics and music.

P. 150-54: “Agnes and Emma” by Ellinora.  Short fiction set in Vermont, on the importance of doing good.

P. 154-57: “Burial and Burial Places” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay.

P. 158-59: “The Spirit-Harp. Gratitude” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)]. Ballad maintaining the importance of gratitude to God.

P. 159-60: “Origin of Small Talk” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Humorous essay offering a feminist version of the Adam and Eve story.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas discusses the “religious character” of Lowell’s “manufacturing population,” specifying the number and kinds of churches, etc.  He discusses the periodical’s engravings.

Cover iv: Engraving of the Roman Catholic Church, Lowell.
 

Series 1, No. 6 (August 1841), p. 161-92

Cover ii: Same information as on cover ii of the previous issue.

P. 161-71: “Susan Miller” by F.G.A.  Short fiction featuring an exemplary factory-girl heroine, who supports her mother and siblings.

P. 171-72: “Choice of Friends” by Caroline [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)].  Essay on friendship.

P. 173: Engraving of the First Congregational Church, Lowell.

P. 174: “Album Tributes.  No. 1.  The Castle” by Ilena [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad with an antiwar theme.

P. 175-77: “Memory and Hope” by Ellen.  In this prose dream vision, the narrator learns not to “covet the garland of fame” but try instead to become useful, benevolent, and “more acceptable to” God.

P. 177-81: “The Whortleberry Excursion: A True Narrative” by Jemima [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  In this regionalist sketch, set in New Hampshire, the narrator recalls a day of picking blueberries with some Quaker neighbors.

P. 182-83: “Lessons of Flowers” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay: narrator contends that “Each flower can teach us a different lesson.”  Religious theme.

P. 184-85: “Beauty” by E.  Essay conveying nature appreciation and religious sentiments.

P. 185: Engraving of the Methodist Church, Hurd St., Lowell.

P. 186-87: “Lowell Cemetery. Consecrated Sabbath Evening, June 20, 1841" by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad maintaining that the cemetery is “hallowed ground.”

P. 188-90: “A Weaver’s Reverie” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay on a factory woman's daydreams about nature.

P. 191-92: “A New Society” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  This prose dream vision, with a factory woman heroine, advocates fair wages for laborers, equal pay and educational opportunities for men and women, an eight-hour workday, etc. See Holdings.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas discusses the difficulties in which the Lowell Offering’s articles are produced, i.e., long working hours and little privacy.  He praises the talent of some of the writers and contends, “We never re-write an article; and we take fewer liberties with any communication than are claimed by the editorial craft every-where.”

Cover iv: Engraving of the Second Universalist Church, Lowell.
 

Series 1, No. 7 (September 1841), p. 193-224

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas proposes that each corporation provide a library for workers to ameliorate “the difficulties attending study & writing in the factory boarding-houses.”

P. 193-200: “Joan of Arc” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Biographical essay recounting the life of this heroine of history.

P. 200-02: “Tears” by Mary [Mary Anne Leonard (m. William G.T. Pierce)].  Essay showing that tears are not “weak and unmanly.”

P. 202-03: “Rural Stanzas” by R.C.T. [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Poem expressing nature appreciation and religious viewpoints.

P. 203-05, 207-09: “La Brainard” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire.  The narrator pleads for greater tolerance for the mentally ill.

[P. 206]: “The Bower of Prayer.”  Song with lyrics and music stressing the importance of prayer.

P. 210: Engraving of the Roman Catholic Church, Lowell.

P. 211: “The Death of Emma” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad reflecting on a young friend’s death, with religious overtones.

P. 212-16: “Moving into the New House” by S.G.B. [Sarah George Bagley (m. James Durno)].  Regionalist fiction set in New Hampshire.

P. 217-21: “Familiar Sketches, No. 3.  The Contrast” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Set in New York City, this short fiction shows “that wealth does not constitute happiness.”

P. 222-24: “Hope and Despair” by Frances.  Prose allegorical vision.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  He reiterates “that all the articles which have been published in the Offering, are the productions of Females employed in the Mills, excepting the verses set to music, and the paragraphs printed on the cover . . . we are personally acquainted with every writer whose communications we have published in this Volume, with four exceptions . . . we required and received a certificate from the Superintendent of the Corporation, assuring us that R.C.T. [Rebecca C. Thompson] is employed in one of the Mills of which he has the charge . . . We care nothing for whatever may be said in relation to our motives for publishing the Offering.”

Cover iv: Engraving of the First Freewill Baptist Church, Lowell.
 

Series 1, No. 8 (October 1841), p. 225-56

P. 225-29: “The Sugar-Making Excursion” by Jemima [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire describing the making of maple sugar.

P. 229: “Album Tributes.  No. 2.  To a Friend” by Ilena [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad expressing good wishes for a friend.

[P. 230]: “A Song of Farewell.”  This song with lyrics and music asks, “When shall we all meet again?”

P. 231-34: “Shade Trees” by M. [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser) or Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Essay expressing appreciation for nature.

P. 234-37: “Ramble of Imagination” by H.J. [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Prose allegory.

P. 237-39: “Stray Thoughts” by Rebecca.  Personal essay relating memories of the narrator’s mother’s death. 

P. 239-49: “Evening before Pay-Day” by Lucinda [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Fiction about factory women tells the story of Rosina, who is working to support her mother and dying sister, while other factory girls are frittering away their money.

P. 249: “The High-School House. The Dedication” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad expressing gratitude for the new high school.

P. 250-52: “Seeking and Seeing” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay recounting the passage of a day.

P. 252: “The Return” by Mary S.  Sketch recounting the return of an erring son.

P. 253: “Friendship” by C.N.  Essay expressing appreciation for friendship’s soothing voice.

P. 253-55: “There Is No Place Like Home” by Maria [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)].  Short fiction showing that happiness is not found “amid the glare of wealth, nor in the gay circle.”

P. 255: “Wild-Flowers” by T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay expressing nature appreciation and gratitude to God.

[P. 256]: Engraving of the Second Universalist Church, Lowell.
 

Series 1, No. 9 (November 1841), p. 257-88

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering, list of agents, and an advertisement for the Central Bookstore, 15 Central Street, Lowell.

P. 257-61: “Fortune-Telling. A Narrative of Salmagundi” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire showing how fortune-telling may be used to influence young people’s choice.

[P. 262]: Engraving of the First Freewill Baptist Church, Lowell.

P. 263-66: “Tales of Factory Life, No. 2.  The Orphan Sisters” by S.G.B. [Sarah George Bagley (m. James Durno)].  Short fiction featuring factory women heroines.  Two young sisters learn “practical benevolence” by working in the mills to support their siblings.

P. 266-67: “Doing Good” by N.  Essay on the importance of charity and love with religious themes.

P. 267: “The Friend of the Fatherless” by Leora.  Religious ballad expressing gratitude for Jesus’s friendship.

P. 268-73: “Aristocracy of Employment” by M.F.  Essay examining the problems of workers’ oppression and class bias.

P. 273-74: “The Good Only Are Happy” by T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay on the importance of virtue.

P. 274-77: “The Country Lawyer” by Veturia.  Short fiction: the country lawyer does not regret selecting a wife from the “city of spindles.”

P. 277: “Album Tributes.  No. 3.  Delhi” by Ilena [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)]. Poem expressing hope that Delhi, that “Famed city of the East,” will emerge from “heathen darkness.”

[P. 278]: “Temperance Rounds.”  Temperance song with music and lyrics.

P. 279-81: “Visit to the Shakers” by C.B. [Caroline Bean].  Essay: narrator recounts her visit to a Shaker Village in New York state, conveying a favorable view of the sect.

P. 281-82: “Intemperance” by T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay on the evils of drinking.

P. 282: “The Wedding Day. Written on a Wedding Occasion” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad urging the groom to “protect, sustain” his new wife.

[P. 283]: Engraving of the John St. Congregational Church, Lowell.

P. 284-85: “My Birth-Day” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay on the passage of time, with religious overtones.

P. 286-87: “On Kindness” by Harriet.  Essay stressing the importance of women’s kindness to one another.

P. 287-88: “The Life of a Pocket Testament. Written by Itself” by Orianna [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Short fiction emphasizing the Bible’s importance.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas comments on the “Aristocracy of Employment” and problems of class bias in the U.S.  He also expresses some disapproval of the Shakers.

Cover iv: Engraving of the Unitarian Church, Lowell.
 

Series 1, No. 10-11 (December 1841), p. 289-352

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering, list of agents.

P. 289-92: “Leaves . . . No. 1.  From the Port-Folio of a Dreamer” by Isabella [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Dream vision advocating that mothers teach their children virtue.

P. 292-94: “The Husking” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set New Hampshire recalling a corn-husking party.

P. 295-302: “Harriet Greenough” by A. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Short fiction: factory woman heroine works in the mills at Newburyport, Massachusetts.

P. 302: “The Parting. Addressed to an Intimate Friend” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Poem in blank verse.

P. 303: “A Visit to My Native Place” by L.C. [Lura Currier (m. Augustus Whitney)].  Essay recounting a factory woman’s visit to her New Hampshire home after a six-year absence.

P. 304: Engraving of the Unitarian Church, Lowell.

P. 305-32: “The Princess. An Oriental Fairy Tale” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Fiction and Orientalist fiction.

P. 332-34: “The Character of Josephine” by Cleora.  Biographical essay about the life of Josephine, who became the French empress as the consort of Napoleon I.

P. 334-35: “November” by Estella [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Essay conveying nature appreciation and religious messages.

P. 335: “Hymeneal” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad blessing a wedding.

P. 336: “Voice of Sympathy” by ***.  Short fiction: an orphan factory girl, Alice Daniels, needs a word of sympathy from her sister operatives.

P. 337-40: “A Second Visit to the Shakers” by C.B. [Caroline Bean].  Essay about the author’s second visit to a Shaker community in New York state, presenting a less favorable view of them than her earlier essay.  Bean mentions that she has worked in factories fourteen years.

P. 340-43: “Leaves . . . No. 2.  From the Port-Folio of a Dreamer” by Isabella [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Allegorical dream vision in which the dreamer learns to value her time and doing good.

P. 344-45: “The Eden of Love.”  This religious hymn with lyrics and music anticipates the joys of heaven.

P. 345: “The Happy Valley.”  Religious hymn with lyrics and music.

P. 346: “Song of the C.W.A.”  Song with lyrics and music commending the Cold Water Army who are “Discarding the use of Rum.”  Temperance theme.

P. 347-48: “Rule of Action” by Q.R.  Religious essay stressing the golden rule’s importance.

P. 348-49: “Happiness” by N.H.  Essay about “the uncertainty of riches,” contending that happiness is found in charity and benevolence.

P. 349-50: “Last Effort of the Poetess: Addressed to a Friend, Who Requested the Writer to Continue Her Poetical Contributions to a Social Circle” by Ilena [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad: dying speaker wishes to complete her last poem.

P. 350-52: “Our Duty to Strangers” by E.  Essay describing the difficulties of factory women leaving home and emphasizing the importance of showing sympathy and love to strangers.

P. 352: Engraving of the Appleton Street Congregational Church, Lowell.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  The text includes various comments about the writings for this and the next issue.  “Our readers will please bear in mind, that all the articles we publish are written by females actively employed in the Mills.”

Cover iv: Extracts from reviews of the Lowell Offering.
 

Series 1, No. 12 (15 December 1841), p. 353-80

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering and miscellaneous notes. 

P. 353-59: “Ambition and Contentment” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Prose allegory showing that religion is more important than seeking fame.

P. 359-60: “The Tree of Liberty” by Emily.  Ballad celebrating the Revolution and American liberty.

P. 361: “Cold Water Song.”  Song with lyrics and music stressing the importance of drinking cold water; temperance theme.

P. 362-64: “The Old Farm-House” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire.  The narrator remembers Governor Wentworth’s mansion in Wolfeboro.

P. 364-65: “Our Household” by H.T.  Personal essay: factory woman narrator tells about her boarding house, listing the periodicals read by the boarders and their religious affiliations.  Despite the “divers faiths,” they “live in much harmony.”

P. 365-69: “Emma and Grace” by Madeline.  Didactic fiction conveying a religious message.

P. 369-70: “Elder Isaac Townsend” by B.N.  Biographical essay about the Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, Freewill Baptist preacher (as identified on cover ii).

P. 371-73: “Independence Bell” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad praising the Revolution and its ideal of liberty.

P. 373: Engraving of the First Universalist Church, Lowell.

P. 374: “O That I Had Wings Like a Dove.”  Religious hymn with lyrics and music.  The speaker turns from “this world of care” to “[t]he light of religion.”

P. 375-78: “Conclusion of the Volume” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay defending the Lowell Offering against criticism.  The narrator asks whether the writers do not have a right to the flowers of life, usually enjoyed only by the leisure class.  She contends that the periodical was never intended to expose the evils of factory life.  “May we not be allowed a harmless recreation?” (378).

P. 379-80: “Index of Contents.”  Index for volume I and Errata.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas] giving his opinions about the Lowell Offering.  “But the highest literary authorities in the land, and even the Reviews across the great waters, have accorded a high meed of merit to the productions of the Yankee Mill Girls; and the active exertions of our friends secured for us a very good list of subscribers.”

Cover iv: Excerpts from reviews of the Lowell Offering are reproduced.
 

Series 2, No. 1-12 (January-August 1842), 380 pp.

Series 2, No. 1 (January 1842), p. 1-32

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas] discussing the aims of the second volume, which will be quite similar to those of the first.

P. 1-12: “Village Pastors” by Susanna [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Autobiographical essay honoring three pastors of the author’s hometown, one of whom was her brother.  Includes some other details about the author’s family.

P. 12-13, 15: “Our Early Days” by B. [Josephine L. Baker (m. Pierce Porter)].  Essay maintaining the futility of regret and ingratitude to God.

P. 14: “Past,–Present,–Future.”  Ballad with lyrics and music includes the following lines: “O leave the past to perish, Lest the present joys we miss.”

P. 15-18: “Disentombment of Napoleon, and the Removal of His Remains from St. Helena to Paris” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad about Napoleon, “Mistaken, great Napoleon!”

P. 18: “Sketches of the Past” by A. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  The author briefly describes her intentions in writing her sketches of the past.

P. 19-23: “Sketches of the Past, No. 1.  Father Moody” by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Biographical sketch set in Maine.

P. 23-28: “Josephine and Maria. A Contrast” by Sarah Ann.  Short fiction contrasting two sisters, one of a sweet temperament and the other of a selfish, gloomy disposition.

P. 28-31: “Glory of Light” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay expressing nature appreciation and religious sentiments.

P. 32: Engraving of the Worthen Street Baptist Church, Lowell.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas.] “Miss Harriet Parker, of 17 Merrimack corporation, departed this life December 10, 1841, aged 47.”  Her poem, “Tell Ye the Daughters of Sion, Behold, Thy King Cometh” is included.  Thomas acknowledges that covers will be omitted from bound volumes: “We publish the poem on the cover.  It will form no part of the volume when bound.”

Cover iv: Engraving of Lowell Street Methodist Episcopal Church, Lowell.
 

Series 2, No. 2 (February 1842), p. 33-64

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Prospectus of the Lowell Offering and list of agents.  A brief notice for Merry’s Museum edited by Peter Parley appears. See Holdings.

P. 33-40: “The First Bells” by Susanna [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Autobiographical essay and regionalist sketch.

P. 41: “Hymn of Consolation.”  Religious song (hymn) with words and music.

P. 42-44: “The Stars and Stripes.”  Essay praising Revolutionary principles and the freedoms won for Americans.

P. 44-46: “The Indian’s Faith” by H.J. [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Historical fiction concerning Native American Indians.

P. 46-47: “The Emigrant Boy” by Louisa [Louisa Currier (m. Nehemiah Osgood)].  Ballad in which death takes several family members.

P. 48: Engraving of the Lowell Street Methodist Episcopal Church.

P. 49-54: “Sketches of the Past, No. 2.  The Unfortunate Man” by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire.

P. 54-55: “The Reformed Inebriates” by Margaret [Margaret Foley (n.m.)].  Essay stressing the importance of temperance and charity.

P. 56-57: “Marion’s Departure” by Orianna [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Biographical essay with a Vermont setting concerning the death of an exemplary woman, Marion.

P. 58: “Ireland” by M.F.R.  Ballad lamenting oppression occurring in Ireland.

P. 58-59: “Visit to a Grave-Yard” by B.C. [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire.  The narrator visits the graves of her loved ones.

P. 59-62: “Winter Amusements” by Ego.  Humorous essay about winter pastimes.

P. 62-63: “An Allegory” by N.S.L.  Prose allegorical dream vision underscoring the importance of learning.

P. 63: “Lowell . . . A Parody” by L.S.H. [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad praising Lowell mill women and the Lowell Offering.

P. 64: “A Reverie” by Bereaved.  Allegorical prose dream vision.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas comments variously on pieces published in the Offering.

Cover iv: Engraving of Worthen Street Baptist Church, Lowell.
 

Series 2, No. 3 (March 1842), p. 65-96

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering and list of agents.  Thomas appeals for subscribers.

P. 65-79: “Leisure Hours of the Mill Girls” by D. [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.].  Didactic fiction about factory women, contrasting those who squander their free time and those who spend it wisely and virtuously.

P. 79-80: “The Tomb of Washington” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Elegiac ballad honoring the memory of George Washington, “the noblest, best.”

P. 81-88: “Sketches of the Past, No. 3.  Scenes on the Merrimac” by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay describing some of the Merrimack River’s history and scenery.

P. 88-91: “Pleasure and Pain” by Rosaline.  Fiction including an allegorical dream vision.  Disappointment teaches the heroine not to follow Pleasure and Pain.

P. 91-93: “The Reverse” by Hannah.  Short fiction: heroine is an elderly factory woman whose savings are lost in a wealthy man’s foolish speculations.

P. 94: “The Trees and the Rill. An Album Tribute” by H.S.L.  Poem in blank verse expressing appreciation for Nature.

P. 95-96: “Home Affections” by Ethel.  Essay: narrator expresses gratitude for blessings received from her parents.

P. 96: “I’ll Try” by Ada [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Didactic fictional sketch in which a young woman learns that she can succeed at writing by trying.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  He comments on some of this issue’s writings.  “We wish we could impress upon the minds of all our mill-girls, the duty they owe to themselves to ‘lay up something for a rainy day.’”

Cover iv: Engraving of Suffolk Street Chapel, Boston, Massachusetts.
 

Series 2, No. 4 (April 1842), p. 97-128

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering and list of agents.

P. 97-101: “The Lessons of Nature” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay expressing appreciation for nature and nature writing.

P. 102-10: “A Legend of the Olden Time” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Fiction and orientalist fiction set in Spain representing conflict between warring Christians and Muslims.

P. 111-13: “Sketches of the Past, No. 4.  Pope Night” by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay describing the celebration of Pope Night by boys in Amesbury and Salisbury, Massachusetts. 

P. 113-15: “Washingtonian Reform” by Orianna [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Essay with a temperance theme including discussion of several female criminals and stressing the importance of love and forgiveness.

P. 115-17: “A Winter Evening” by B.C. [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire; temperance theme.

P. 117-18: “My Schoolmates” by Maria [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser)].  Autobiographical essay: narrator contends that “Time . . . changes all things.” 

P. 119: “My Childhood Home” by E.F.  Ballad.

P. 119-24: “The Suffolk-Street Chapel” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay discussing religious denominations and observance among Lowell factory women and the creation of Free Chapels, such as the Suffolk-Street Chapel in Boston.

P. 122: Engraving of the Suffolk-Street Chapel, Boston.

P. 124-26: “The Dealings of Providence.”  Essay pondering the meaning of adversity and suffering, with religious overtones.

P. 126-27: “Intemperance” by R.C.T. [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Poem in blank verse about the evils of intemperance.

P. 127-28: “Energy of Character” by T.E.H.  Essay conveying a religious message.

Cover iii: Extracts from a New Orleans Picayune review of the Offering.

Cover iv: Continuations of the review from cover iii.  Miscellaneous notes.
 

Series 2, No. 5-6 (May 1842), p. 129-92

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering and list of agents.

P. 129-37: “Life among Farmers” by A.F.D.  Fiction about farm life.

P. 138-43: “Sketches of the Past, No. 5.  Handkerchief Moody” by A. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Regionalist sketch about the life of Joseph Moody, the subject also of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s story “The Minister’s Black Veil.”

P. 143-44: “The First Dish of Tea” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Autobiographically-based, humorous regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire.

P. 145-55: “The White Mountain Sisters” by Hannah.  Short fiction set in New Hampshire and Lowell.  Factory heroines work to support themselves and their family.

P. 155: “Memory” by Lura [Lura Currier (m. Augustus Whitney)].  Essay conveying a religious message.

P. 156-57: “The World We Live In” by Clara.  Short fiction considering suffering and death and offering religious hope.

P. 159-60: “The Village Pastor” by C.L.  The protagonist of this short fiction is an exemplary pastor.

P. 161-75: “Chapters on the Science” by D. [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Essay considering factory women’s great desires for education; includes two women’s conversation about physiology.

P. 175-78: “Sketches of the Past, No. 6.  Preceptor Moody” by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay sketching the life of Samuel Moody (a son of Handkerchief Moody), who became the famous Master Moody of Dummer Academy, Byfield.

P. 179: “Canadian Boat Song.”  Song with lyrics and music.

P. 180-81: “The Christian’s Anchor.”  Religious hymn with lyrics and music.

P. 182: “The Christian’s Hope.”  Religious hymn with lyrics and music, featuring the refrain, “We all shall meet in heaven.”

P. 183-85: “Unbelief and Faith. An Allegory” by Orianna [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Prose allegory.  The figures of Unbelief and Faith guide the narrator, who learns a religious lesson.

P. 185: “The Letter from Home” by Eugenia.  Ballad expressing happiness at receiving a letter from home.

P. 186: “Alone” by Phoebe.  Essay on solitude, with religious themes.

P. 187: Engraving of the Temple, Tremont Street, Boston.

P. 187-90: “A Dream” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Prose allegorical dream vision.

P. 191: “The Forest Trees” by R.C.T. [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Ballad expressing nature appreciation and  religious beliefs.

P. 192: “The Dignity of Labor” by C.B. [Caroline Bean].  Essay defending laboring women’s honor.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas alludes to “Chapters on the Sciences” and “Gossip and Mimicry.”  He defends mill women: “[T]here are girls in the Mills who, in respect of talent and education, and facility of communicating what they know, would put to blush the large majority of your parlor folks in the great cities of the land.”

Cover iv: Engraving of the Temple, Tremont Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
 

Series 2, No. 7 (June 1842), p. 193-224

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering and list of agents.

P. 193-204: “Gossip and Mimicry” by K.  Humorous fiction.

P. 204-07: “The Shipwreck” by Eugenia.  Poem in blank verse.  A husband and wife cling to life after a shipwreck.  The speaker contends that “true nobility, is often hid / Beneath the surface rough.”

P. 207-08: “Sabbath Morning” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Dream vision set in Lowell and New Hampshire.  Factory woman longs for childhood scenes near Lake Winnipesaukee.  She wishes to “pay to Nature’s God the sacrifice of praise.” See Holdings.

P. 209-13: “Sketches of the Past, No. 7.  A Sufferer” by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Biographical essay about the author’s uncle.

P. 213-14: “A Morning Ramble” by Lura [Lura Currier (m. Augustus Whitney)].  Essay expressing nature appreciation.

P. 214-15: “Whisperings of My House-Leek” by Wilton.  Personal essay recounting a factory woman’s musings and memories, with religious overtones.

P. 215-17: “The Indian Pledge” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Set in Connecticut, this historical fiction represents an encounter between a Native American Indian and Euro-American settlers, censuring oppression of Native Americans. See Holdings.

P. 218: “Praise Ye the Lord.”  Religious hymn with lyrics and music.

P. 218: “Gospel Invitation.”  Religious hymn with lyrics and music.

P. 219-21: “Ambition and Contentment” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Religious essay recommending that people cultivate submissiveness, cheerfulness, contentment, and gratitude.

P. 221-23: “Journey to Lebanon Springs” by C.N.  In this autobiographical essay, a factory woman travels from Lowell to western Massachusetts, painting some of the scenes and people encountered.

P. 224: “A New Version of an Old Story” by F.Y.  Allegory expressing appreciation for Abel C. Thomas and defending the Lowell Offering against detractors.

P. 224: “The Sabbath School” by R.C.T. [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Ballad praising the sabbath school as a “blessed place.”

Cover iii: “The Lowell Offering” by E.L. [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)], “Christmas Day, 1840.”  Ballad expressing appreciation for the Lowell Offering.

Cover iv: [Editorial commentary by Abel C. Thomas] and “Marriages.”  Thomas reveals that “The poem on the preceding page was written by a lady at the South at the time of its date, and transmitted to a friend of hers in this State.”  He cites some statistics on marriages in Lowell under the names of the various clergy.
 

Series 2, No. 8-9 (July 1842), p. 225-88

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering and list of agents.  Other notes.

P. 225-36: “Chapters on the Sciences. Astronomy” by D. [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Several women discuss astronomy, which shows God’s power.

P. 237-43: “Four Pictures” by Gertrude [Mary Anne Leonard (m. William G.T. Pierce)].  Short fiction presenting scenes from the life of a rich woman, Anna, who is taught by suffering to turn to God.

P. 244-46: “The Sequestered Harp. A Ballad” by Melodia (Miss Lane).  Ballad.

P. 246-50: “The Widow’s Son” by Orianna [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Short fiction: mother works in the Lowell mills to support her son’s education.

P. 250-61: “Fiction. A Dialogue” [by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Two women discuss the merits and defects of fiction, with references to many authors.

P. 261: “Divine Love” by Ellen.  Religious ballad.

P. 262-63: “Prayer in a Sick-Room” by Jemima [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Humorous regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire.

P. 264-73: “Chapters on the Sciences. Geology and Mineralogy” by D. [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Several women discuss geology and mineralogy.

P. 273: “Our Home” by R.C.T. [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Ballad expressing appreciation for the speaker’s childhood home.

P. 274-75: “A Fire-Side Scene” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  In this regionalist sketch, a man recalls his participation in a U.S. army massacre of the inhabitants of a Miami Indian village. See Holdings.

P. 275: “Farmer’s Homestead” by F.Y.  Essay describing a New England farm.

P. 276: “The Silver Cup” by L.A.  Essay considering factory women’s charitable contributions, which they often cannot afford.

P. 277-82: “Sketches of the Past, No’s 8, 9" by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Biographical essays about Jack Eastman and Elder Babcock.

P. 282-83: “Be Not Unkind” by Adaline.  Personal essay.

P. 283-85: “Cleaning Up” by M.E.  Humorous essay about a spider and spider web seen in a factory window.

P. 285-87: “Tribute to Salmagundi” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire.  The narrator pays tribute to her hometown.

P. 287-88: “Jacko” by Fanny.  Essay about the crow.

Cover iii: [Commentary by Abel C. Thomas].  Thomas gives some information on Lowell’s Corporation Hospital, such as, “Price of board per week, females, $3; males, $4 – attendance, physician, &c., all included.”

Cover iv: Engraving of the Corporation Hospital, Lowell.
 

Series 2, No. 10 (15 July 1842), p. 289-320

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering and list of agents.

P. 289-97: “Disasters Overcome” by F.  Short fiction including a character, Caroline Herbert, a girl who works in the Lowell mills and is “a lovely specimen of angelic humanity” (291).

P. 297-98: “Contempt” by Eugenia.  Poem in blank verse conveying a religious message.

P. 299-300: “Garden of Life” by Jane [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Factory woman’s prose allegorical dream vision.

P. 300-06: “Chapters on the Sciences. Geology and Mineralogy” by D. [Eliza Jane Cate (n.m.)].  Several women discuss geology and mineralogy.

P. 306-18: “The Unsetting Sun” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  In this science fiction piece, the sun ceases to set.

P. 318: “What I Love To See” by R.C.T. [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Ballad expressing the speaker’s love of virtue.

P. 318-19: “A Reverie” by B.C. [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Dream vision.  Falling asleep at her work, a factory woman dreams of leaving the mill, becoming a mermaid, and enjoying “unrestrained freedom.”

P. 320: “Home” by M.A. [Mary Anne Spaulding (m. Milo Pierce)?].  Personal essay: narrator relates her homesickness and longing for education.

Cover iii: William Schouler (1814-1872) writes that he has purchased the Lowell Offering and the Operatives’ Magazine and “proposes to unite both works in one and publish them monthly under the original title of the Lowell Offering, the first number of which will be issued on or about the 1st of September next.  He pledges himself that the work shall continue while in his hands to be devoid of sectarianism of any sort, and that the articles shall be the production of the female operatives at work in the mills . . .”  A subscription will be $1.00 per year. See Holdings.

Cover iv: An advertisement for the Central Bookstore, including its Circulating Library, at 15 Central Street, Lowell.
 

Series 2, No. 11-12 (August 1842), p. 321-80

Cover ii: Prospectus of the Lowell Offering and list of agents.

P. 321-35: “A Tale of Life As It Is” by M. [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser) or Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Fiction, partly epistolary.

P. 335-37: “Witchcraft” by Tabitha [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist sketch set in New Hampshire about two women believed to be witches.

P. 337-48: “The Delusion of the Heart” by B.C. [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Short fiction recounting the seduction and death of the heroine and her seducer, including elements of adventure and sensation.

P. 349-50: “Lament of the Little Hunchback” by Letty [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad describing a disabled child’s trials.

P. 350-52: “This World Is Not Our Home” by Beatrice.  Religious essay maintaining that only God’s love never fades.

P. 353-61: “The Village Chronicle” by Lucinda [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Regionalist, humorous fiction.

P. 362-65: “Sketches of the Past, No. 10” by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Short fiction concerning the wreck of The Walter Scott.

P. 365: “Sarah” by R.C.T. [Rebecca C. Thompson].  Ballad representing a girl’s death.

P. 365-67: “Charlotte Howard” by Lura [Lura Currier (m. Augustus Whitney)].  Short fiction about an orphan.

P. 368: “Labors of Others” by F.Y.  Essay expressing appreciation for reformers’ efforts to elevate laborers.

P. 369: Untitled etching of a building.

P. 370: “Kedron.”  Song with lyrics and music.

P. 370: “Howell.”  Religious song with lyrics and music.

P. 371: “God Is Love.”  Religious song with lyrics and music.

P. 372-73: “No” by Adelaide [Lydia Sears Hall (m. Isaiah Graffam)].  Ballad stressing the importance of the word “no.”

P. 374-75: “The Old Oaken Bucket.”  Song with lyrics and music expressing nostalgia for a country home.

P. 375-76: “Vale of Avoca.”  Song including lyrics and music.

P. 377-79: “Gold Watches” by A Factory Girl.  Essay responding to Mrs. Hale’s complaint in the Godey'sLady's Book that one cannot distinguish factory girls from ladies because even factory girls wear gold watches; class bias.

P. 379-80: “Editor’s Valedictory” by Abel C. Thomas.  Thomas’s last editorial, which reiterates “his pledge to exclude everything [i.e., from the Lowell Offering] of a sectarian character” and urges some improvements in the mills and boardinghouses.

[P. 381-84]: Index of the second volume’s contents.

Cover iii: Same text as on cover iii of the 15 July 1842 issue.

Cover iv: Advertisement for the Central Bookstore, 15 Central Street, Lowell.
 

Series 3 (October 1842-September 1843), 284 pp.

Series 3, No. 1 (October 1842), p. 1-24

Cover i: The Lowell Offering and Magazine; Written and Edited by Factory Operatives.  Epigraph: “Is Saul Also among the Prophets.”  “Lowell: Published by William Schouler,” etc.

P. 1-4: “Factory Blossoms for Queen Victoria” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad addressing women’s power, the wrongs committed by the British empire, and class bias. 

P. 5-9: “First Efforts of Genius” by Kate [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Humorous regionalist sketch addressing the subjects of women’s writing and marriage.

P. 10-12: “Stories from the Linn-Side.  No. 1.  The Miniature” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Sensational fiction: heroine dies of a broken heart.  The story includes temperance and religious themes.

P. 12: “Life” by C.S.  Ballad expressing the sadness of life’s pains and disappointments.

P. 13-14: “The Bridge of Sighs” by ***.  Ballad about a betrayed woman.

P. 14-20: “The Portrait Gallery.  No. 1.  Pocahontas” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Biographical essay examining Pocahontas’s life.

P. 20: “The Laborer’s Remonstrance” by C. [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Fictional dialogue protesting against oppression of workers.

P. 21: “The River” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad expressing nature appreciation.

P. 21-22: “Originality” by E.A.L. [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)].  Essay about imagination and creativity.

P. 22-23: “The Old-Fashioned Collar” by Orianna [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Short fiction addressing class bias.

P. 23-24: “Editorial. Address to Our Patrons” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley explains the aims of the Lowell Offering, which include diminishing prejudice against factory operatives and publishing only “the contributions of females actively employed in the mills.”

Cover iii: Harriet Jane Farley reviews The Dartmouth, published by the senior class at Dartmouth College.  She lists names of those recently deceased: “Died in Lowell, September 26, Robert Means, Esq., aged 56 . . . Agent of the Suffolk Manufacturing Company.  Deaths, among the female operatives of Lowell, from September 1 to September 29.  Miss Hannah Fay, aged 17; Miss Sarah Silsbee, aged 20; Miss Ursula B. Stephens, aged 19; Miss Julia Hill, aged 18; Miss Amanda Buttrick, aged 19.”  Miscellaneous notes.

Cover iv: Table of contents, list of agents, and prospectus for the Lowell Offering.
 

Series 3, No. 2 (November 1842), p. 25-48

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley includes some notes “To Correspondents.”  The text includes an obituary for William Ellery Channing (1780-1842) and notices of four female operatives’ deaths: “October 8, Miss Naomi Roe, aged 25, No. 60 Lawrence corp.; October 15, Miss Susan Kelly, aged 22, Hospital; October 22, Miss Augusta Locke, aged 17, No. 54 Boott corp.; October 30, Miss Rachel N. Gates, Lowell street, corporation unknown.”  Farley comments on the upcoming lecture by Mrs Gove[Mrs. Mary Sargeant Gove Nichols]See Holdings.

P. 25-30: “Aunt Letty; or, The Useful” by Kate [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Regionalist fiction including a dream vision.

P. 31-32: “Charity” by E.E.T. [Elizabeth Emerson Turner (m. Charles Sawyer)].  Essay.

P. 32-34: “Evidence of Design in Nature” by Annaline.  Essay arguing that nature appreciation leads to religious insight.

P. 34: “Departed Summer Flowers” by Rebecca.  Essay expressing nature appreciation.

P. 35-42: “The Task of Death” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad about death.

P. 42: “Something New” by Clara.  Essay: narrator reflects on her experience writing for the Lowell Offering.

P. 43-44: “Stories from the Linn-Side.  No. 2.  The First Grief” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Sentimental fiction: mother experiences her child’s death.

P. 45: “What Is Beautiful?” by M.R.G. [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Ballad stressing the importance of turning “from Mammon’s shrine.”

P. 45-46: “Cousin Judith’s Visit to Boston” by Isabella [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Regionalist fiction giving many details of scenes in and around Boston.

P. 47-48: “Editorial. History of the Lowell Offering” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Chronicles some of the history of the Lowell Offering and the Improvement Circle.
 

Series 3, No. 3 (December 1842), p. 49-72

Cover ii: “To Subscribers and Correspondents” by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy).  Farley attempts to clarify misconceptions that are circulating about the Lowell Offering, e.g., that it is actually run by men or that men assist the editors.

P. 49-54: “The Young Wife” by Grace [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Fiction about marriage.

P. 55: “He Is Not Here–He Is Risen” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad with religious message.

P. 56-57: “Plea for the Indian” by J.S.W. [Jane S. Welch].  Essay sympathetic to the suffering of Native American Indians but insisting that the kind of reparation needed is for “their uncultivated minds [to] be taught the high value of civilization and learning,” as well as Christianity.

P. 57-58: “The Prospect from My Window in the Mill” by M.T.  Essay: factory woman contemplates her view of the canal, machine shop, railroad cars, houses, churches, etc.

P. 58-59: “My Grandfather’s Queue” by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy) or Rebecca C. Thompson].  Biographical essay about the author’s grandfather.

P. 60-64: “Stories from the Linn-Side.  No. 3.  The Victim of Revenge” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Sensational fiction.

P. 64-65: “The Dentist’s Arm-Chair. A Parody” by Quizziana.  Humorous poem.

P. 65-68: “The Portrait Gallery.  Nos. 2 & 3.  Cleopatra and Zenobia” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Biographical essays.

P. 69: “Autumnal Thoughts” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad on nature appreciation.

P. 69-72: “Editorial.  Home in a Boarding-House” [by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)?].  The annoyance of “evening visitors, such as pedlers, candy and newspaper boys, shoe-dealers, book-sellers, &c., &c., breaking in upon the only hours of leisure we can call our own.” See Holdings.

Cover iii: Notices of various periodicals.

Cover iv: Table of contents and list of agents.  Gives details about the various Improvement Circles in Lowell.  Miscellaneous notes.
 

Series 3, No. 4 (January 1843), p. 73-96

Cover ii: Notices of various publications, some on religious subjects such as prayer and sin.

[Facing p. 73]: An engraving entitled, “The Fairies.”

P. 73-75: “The Misanthrope” by Grace [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Fictional soliloquy with philosophical and religious meditation.

P. 75-76: “On a Young Man Lost at Sea” by M.B.G.  Elegiac ballad with religious message.

P. 77-80: “Incidents of Adventure.  No. 1” by Kate [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Fiction set in New England.

P. 80: “Curiosity” by S.F.L.  Essay.

P. 81-82: “The Picture” by Isabella [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Sentimental fiction.

P. 82: “Say, Where Does Beauty Dwell?” by Clara.  Essay conveying nature appreciation and religious message.

P. 82: “If tears be shed . . .”  Brief ballad about death.

P. 83-84: “The Fairies. Part First” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad and fantasy.

P. 85-88: “Stories from the Linn-Side.  No. 4.  A Christmas Tale” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Fiction about a woman artist.

P. 88: “Song of the Invalid Girl” by Marah [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)?].  Ballad expressing the sadness of a girl who expects to “lie / Among the early dead.”

P. 89-95: “Cousin Mary” by Betsey [Betsey Guppy (m. Josiah Chamberlain, Thomas Wright, Charles Boutwell, I.A. Horn)].  Regionalist fiction set in New Hampshire.  The heroine dies of a broken heart.

P. 95-96: “Editorial” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley reviews Charles Dickens's American Notes for General Circulation and comments on the new year. See Holdings.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley reminds Lowell Offering writers that “they are entitled to a stated compensation, and also to a copy of the Offering.”  Gives the time of the next Improvement Circle meeting and reports that there were no deaths among female operatives during the two months preceding January 1, 1843.

Cover iv: Table of contents and list of agents.  Prospectus of the Lowell Offering.
 

Series 3, No. 5 (February 1843), p. 97-120

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Literary notices and reviews.

P. 97-100: “Ada, the Factory Maid” by Annaline.  Fiction: hardworking factory girl helps to support her family.  Unable to obtain further education, she devotes her free time to study.

P. 100-01: “Reading” by Dorcas [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)].  Essay.

P. 101-02: “Philip Saith unto Him, ‘Lord, Show Us the Father, and It Sufficeth Us.’ –John xiv. 8” by M.R.G. [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Religious ballad.

P. 102: “The Silent Expressions of Nature” by S.J.H. [S.J. Hough?].  Essay on nature appreciation.

P. 103-05: “Stories from the Linn-Side.  No. 5.  The Young Widow” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Sentimental fiction.

P. 106-07: “The Village Burial” by J.S.W. [Jane S. Welch].  Regionalist fiction: man’s death caused by dueling.

P. 107-09: “Incidents of Adventure.  No. 2” by Kate [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Fiction set in New England.

P. 109: “Beauty” by H.  Brief essay.

P. 110-13: “The Fairies. Part Second” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad and fantasy.

P. 113-18: “The Portrait Gallery.  No. 3.  Zenobia” by Ella [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Biographical essay.

P. 118: “Winter Forest Musings” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad on nature appreciation with religious message.

P. 118: “For Sabbath Morning” by Caroline [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)].  Religious poem in hymn stanzas.

P. 119-20: “Editorial. Forefathers’ Day” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Editorial commending celebrations in Boston and New York marking December 22, the date in 1620 when the Pilgrims arrived in New England, “the birthday of religious freedom.”

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Continuation of notices and reviews from cover ii.  Two deaths among the operatives are noted: “January 19, Miss Susan Medkiff, aged 23. February 1, Mrs. Hannah Wilder, aged 56.”

Cover iv: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Table of contents and list of agents.  The editor appeals for more written contributions.  Messages to subscribers and patrons.
 

Series 3, No. 6 (March 1843), p. 121-44

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  The editor discusses the present circumstances of the Lowell Offering.  “Our subscription list is very good; and the Offering, for the present, may be considered permanent . . . We have found more friends out of this city than we anticipated; and that we have no more friends here we attribute to mistaken views with regard to our duties, and our motives in the course we have pursued.  We are sorry that we have gained so little favor with our fellow-operatives, in this city . . .”

P. 121-26: “Charity” by Grace [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Fiction with feminist themes.

P. 127-28: “How Beautiful Are All the Works of God” by L. [Lura Currier (m. Augustus Whitney)].  Religious essay with nature appreciation.

P. 128: “True Charity. A Paraphrase on I Corinthians xiii” by L.A.B. [Lucy Ann Baker (m. George Choate)?].  Religious ballad.

P. 128-29: “A Fragment” by L. [Lura Currier (m. Augustus Whitney)].  Religious essay with nature appreciation.

P. 129-30: “Our Native Land” by Inez [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Essay on love for one’s childhood home.

P. 130: “Lines to O.P.H.” by Quip.  Ballad on sadness at parting.

P. 131-34: “Stories from the Linn-Side.  No. 6.  The Male Coquette” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Sentimental fiction.  “Fair southern flower . . . ruthlessly destroyed” by a male coquette.

P. 135-38: “The Fairies. Part Third” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad and fantasy.

P. 138-40: “The Destruction of the Jewish Temple” by J.S.W. [Jane S. Welch].  Religious and historical essay.

P. 140-41: “Lafayette at the Tomb of Washington” by M.S.L.  Essay expressing great admiration for Lafayette, Washington, and all those who won American independence from Britain.

P. 141-42: “Comedy at the Parsonage” by C. [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Regionalist sketch; humor.

P. 142: “To a Faded Rose” by E.D.  Poem.  Speaker’s disillusionment with human love and earthly beauty.

P. 143-44: “Editorial. Books and Reading” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Discusses factory girls’ reading habits.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Notices of various publications.  Alludes to Lowell women’s feminism: “Lowell girls are very tenacious of their rights.  It will then be one of their rights to propose for a husband, and some of them think now they should have legislative authority for doing in almost all things as they please.”  Gives meeting time of one Improvement Circle.  Three deaths among the female operatives are noted: “February 13, Miss Harriet Graffam, aged 21; February 17, Miss Lorinda Waldron, aged 19; February 26, Miss Almira Graffam, aged, 21.”

Cover iv: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Table of contents and list of agents.  Editor addresses contributors (“we have no reason to complain of our contributors”) and critics (“In some of our exchange papers we find ourselves criticised, and we are very glad that some of our friends are willing to point out our faults . . . we do not think it right to alter materially the articles sent for insertion”).
 

Series 3, No. 7 (April 1843), p. 145-68

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Errata are noted.  Farley lists some other kinds of corporations (i.e., non-textile) in Lowell.  One literary notice.

P. 145-49: “Lowell” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Essay discussing the history and current conditions of Lowell.

P. 149-52: “Incidents of Adventure.  No. 3.  A Travelling Sketch” by Kate [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Fiction.

P. 152: “To the Æolian Harp” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad with religious message.

P. 153-55: “Faith and Fancy” by Y.M. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Essay.

P. 155: “Our Thoughts Are Heard in Heaven” by E.L. [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)].  Religious essay.

P. 156-60: “Our Poor Relation” by Annette [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy) or Rebecca C. Thompson].  Regionalist fiction and biographical sketch.

P. 161-62: “Lines Addressed to the Comet. In Imitation of Burns” by Coila [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Ballad in Scottish dialect.

P. 162-63: “Solitude” by Adeline.  Essay with religious message.

P. 163-64: “The Indians” by M.R.G. [Miriam R. Green (divorced from Cromwell Kimball)].  Ballad lamenting the passing of the Native American Indians, “Who greeted the haughty white man with a cheer, / Till taught treach’ry by being betrayed.”

P. 164-68: “Editorial. Composition. Hard Times” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  The editor discusses how the noise of the mills impedes reflection.  Yet “[m]any of the best articles in the Offering we know to have been composed in the mill.”  To ameliorate the hard economic times, young women should give up English and French finery and support American manufactures.  Includes several book reviews.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Several literary notices, including one for Charles Dickens's Martin Chuzzlewit's.  One note reads thus: “Some of our operatives did not like our assertion, on the cover of the last number, that they would go to Iowa, &c.  Many of them do not believe in matrimony, and the others think they will wait till the “Iowas” come for them.  We shall henceforth consider it one of the disputed questions, with which the Offering hath nothing to do.”  The deaths of four factory women are noted: “March 4th, Louisa Newbert, aged 21; 18th, Charlotte A. Smith, 19; 20th, Sarah B. Bassford, 22; 29th, Isabel Wilson, 21.”  Gives the time and place of the next Improvement Circle meeting held at No. 33 Lawrence Corp. See Holdings.

Cover iv: Table of contents and list of agents.
 

Series 3, No. 8 (May 1843), p. 169-92

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Literary notices.  Farley recalls that in childhood she was discouraged from reading Shakespeare, because it was considered improper reading for females.  She now believes that “‘[w]omen and girls’ must read Shakspeare [sic], if they would have a thorough knowledge of English literature.”

P. 169-70: “The White Dress; or, Village Aristocracy” by Kate [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Regionalist fiction with anti-racist theme; humor.

P. 171: “Lines Addressed to a Cloud” by M.A. [Mary Anne Spaulding (m. Milo Pierce)?].  Ballad on nature appreciation.

P. 171-72: “Life’s Changes” by H.L. [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Essay on life’s mutability.

P. 172-73: “Poems, Delivered on Various Occasions, before the Mechanic Apprentices’ Library Association, by Members of the Institution” by H.J. [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Brief fictional sketch in which a sister and brother discuss poetry.

P. 173-74: “The Admirer of Nature” by **M. [Maria/Marcia Currier (m. Ferdinand C. Keyser) or Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Nature poem in blank verse; humor.

P. 174-75: “Twilight Musings” by Grace [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)]. Essay with religious message.

P. 175: “Stanzas” by Caroline [Emeline Augusta Larcom (m. Rev. George Spaulding)].  Ballad: Earth’s beauty awakens desires for “immortal bliss.”

P. 176-80: “Poetry.  A Dialogue” [by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)?].  Dialogue.  Two women discuss qualities of poetry and poets, with references to many poets.

P. 180: “A Swedish Cure for Duelling.  Translated from the French” by E.W.S.  Brief prose sketch.

P. 181-86: “The Fairies.  Part Fourth” by H.F. [by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)?].  Ballad and fantasy.

P. 187-88: “Unstable as Water, Thou Shalt Not Excel” by J.S.W. [Jane S. Welch].  Fiction about a man who lacks stability of character.

P. 188-90: “The Poet’s Dream” by Isabella [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Allegorical dream vision with religious message.

P. 190-92: “Editorial. Health” by [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)?].  Editor discusses “the influence of factory labor upon health.”  She tends to minimize mill work’s unhealthy aspects.
 

Series 3, No. 9 (June 1843), p. 193-216

Cover ii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Literary notices and reviews.

P. 193-98: “The Wanderer” by Annaline.  Fiction: son leaves his New Hampshire home for a seafaring life.

P. 199: “Lines Addressed to a Brother on His Departure for the Far West” by M.A. [Mary Anne Spaulding (m. Milo Pierce)?].  Ballad.

P. 199-200: “Chapters on Life as It Is.  No. 1” by H.J. [Hannah Johnson (m. Calvin W. Noyes)].  Didactic essay with religious message.

P. 201: “Memento Mori” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad with the refrain, “Remember, thou must die!”

P. 201-02: “History” by Clara.  Essay on the importance of studying history.

P. 203-07: “A Letter about Hard Times” by Kate [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Economic essay.

P. 207: “Complaint of a Nobody” by Y.M. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad: speaker regards herself as “an unsightly weed,” “a vain useless thing.”

P. 208-11: “Stories from the Linn-Side.  No. 7.  The Embroidered Scarf” by Ione [Harriet A. Lees (m. John F. Carney)].  Sensational fiction.

P. 211-12: “The Voyage of Fernando up the Mississippi” by S.J.H. [S.J. Hough?].  Fictionalized treatment of historical events.

P. 212-13: “The Pudding; or, Critical Situation of a Stranger in America.  Translated from the French” by E.W.S.  Humorous fiction.

P. 213-16: “Editorial. A Manual Labor School. A Letter from Miss Martineau” by H.F. [Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Farley proposes that a school be established in Lowell for operatives to attend half the day and work in the mills the other half.  She advocates a reduction in mill working hours.  She quotes passages from Harriet Martineau's “Letter” praising the Lowell Offering.  See Holdings.

Cover iii: [Editorial commentary by Harriet Jane Farley (m. John I. Donlevy)].  Continuation of literary notices and reviews from cover ii.  Reports Improvement Circle meeting times and places.

Cover iv: Table of contents and lists of the Lowell Offering’s agents in Boston, Massachusetts; Providence, Rhode Island; Nashua, New Hampshire; Saxonville, Massachusetts; New Haven, Connecticut; Dover, New Hampshire; Manchester, New Hampshire; Amesbury, Massachusetts; Willimantic, Connecticut; Worcester, Massachusetts; Salem & Beverly, Massachusetts; Chickopee, Massachusetts; Newburyport, Massachusetts; Troy, New York; Hartford, Connecticut; New York City; Middlebury College, Vermont; Windsor, Vermont; J.D. Bickford, Travelling Agent, J.M. Whittemore, Travelling Agent.
 

Series 3, No. 10 (July 1843), p. 217-40

Cover ii: Literary notices.

P. 217-25: “Woman’s Influence” by Grace [Harriot F. Curtis (n.m.)].  Fiction with feminist themes.  A wife leaves her intemperate husband to live with the Shakers and then work in the mills.

P. 225-26: “Thought” by S.J.L. [Sarah J. Lyon].  Essay on the nature of thought.

P. 226-27: “The Murderer’s Request” by L.L. [Lucy Larcom (n.m.)].  Ballad: murderer requests his burial place.

P. 227-28: “An Upright Judge Is No Respecter of Persons.  Translated from the French” by E.W.S.  Historical sketch.

P. 228: “Friendship” by M.A. [Mary Anne Spaulding (m. Milo Pierce)?].  Ballad expressing sadness for the passing of time.

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